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BKildahl - Why I Play What I Play [10:35] 
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Post BKildahl - Why I Play What I Play [10:35]
Poster: BKildahl
Rating Class: National Master | Videos Made: 63
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Video Tags: kia kid opening pirc

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Liked By: detroitman, Ruy Perez, Lolchair, alainlietard, Nazgulrw



Sun Jan 13, 2008 9:32 pm
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Interesting video as always BK. I'm curious about something though. I understand you're trying to avoid other people's lines (one reason that I like the French, I've never seen anyone like the French as white. :-) )

But why is it d3 e4 in the KIA? (I've never played it) it just seems weird to consciously block your fianchettoed Bishop with a pawn. The knight is dynamic enough to make it alright, but the pawn can be barricaded onto e4 to keep your Bishop VERY bad quite easily it seems.

I'm not questioning your methods, just trying to understand the e4 idea behind the KIA.

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Sun Jan 13, 2008 9:48 pm
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That's a good question, Rob, and I think Josh Waitzkin said it best in one of his videos for Chessmaster (more specifically, one of the ones about the Four Knights opening). The bishop gets blocked in, but is unlikely (with proper play) to stay blocked in, as white's likely next pawn break is either f4 or d4. It's true that black doesn't have to capture on f4 or d4, freeing the bishop, but a good player can make it so that black's alternatives are even worse.

That was not a direct quote, by the way. I haven't watched those videos in a long time.

Brett

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Sun Jan 13, 2008 9:57 pm
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Thanks Brett

Something I have never figured out to do in my earlier days. I was always having my butt kicked but I always blamed my sloppy play in general not the opening. And I was very scared to study opening as Josh Waitzkin kept talking how endgames and middlegames are way more important and I still tend to agree. But slowly I've been learning the ideas behind every black set up he could play. Of course the stronger player you play the better understanding one should have

Basically it's just a matter of taste and your reasoning makes a lot of sense, besides you like it! Keep it up then :thumright:

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Mon Jan 14, 2008 1:42 am
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Very awesome video, Brett! :)

I used to play the Moller Gambit (Italian with 6... Bb4+ 7. Nc3 Nxe4) just because it was the only theory I needed to know (and Black has lots of chances to go wrong). Lately I've been playing the Bird OTB.

One of my friends learned the Nimzovitch Defense against 1. e4 (Nc6 2. d4 d5); I still haven't looked at it, but it might be a good surprise weapon for tournaments & such.

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Mon Jan 14, 2008 5:38 am
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Thanks for taking the time to make this video. You have a good point about all the openings. Interesting.

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Mon Jan 21, 2008 5:38 pm
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I’m not sure that playing as Brett does would be the best approach for a complete beginner. Remember, Brett is already a strong player and some strong players prefer to play a system approach as Brett and Josh (Trompovsky and Pseudo Trompovsky) do which means you don’t have to study openings so much and some people prefer to play more diverse openings. Maybe there are advantages to both approaches.

One of things that would worry me about choosing a closed opening approach as one’s only opening would be that it might make it harder to play more open positions where the initiative is important and it could be harder to switch openings later on when say you might want to play more mainstream openings. After all there is a reason why main lines are main lines! You don’t need to play the absolute main main line theory anyway. Often you can choose a slightly less fashionable variation. For instance as a queen pawn player it’s not necessary to meet the King’s Indian with the currently hyper trendy and theoretical Bayonet Attack or to go into the Botvinnik variation of the Semi Slav. There are many alternatives that are less theoretical and probably equally good if not as fashionable. In any case, it’s much more important to understand the ideas behind what you are playing than to try and remember reams of theory that you don’t understand. There’s a sort of Murphy’s law of openings: However much theory you learn your opponent will always choose the continuation you know least well. Studying openings is good at any level if what you are doing is playing through typical grand master middle games and endgames that arise from those openings and remembering the kind of plans that lead to those positions, rather than exact move sequences of trappy tactical lines.

If I had my time as a complete beginner again I think I would start out by playing much more dynamic, active openings and gambit openings. In fact one of the more successful decisions I made early on was to play the Sicilian Lasker Pelikan variation as black (Ijust loved to play ...f5 and here you get to play it twice). At the time (some time ago...) this was little known and considered to be inferior. My opponents would give me that pitying look when I played ...e5 and lick their lips maliciously. However, although I was weak and knew almost none of the theory, I won quite a lot of games against players rated many hundreds of points higher than me, when they did very stupid things such as sacrifice their pieces on ...b5, without having any idea what to do afterwards. In one tournament after three rounds I found myself playing in the master section against a well known English IM, pretty much on the strength of this opening (I lost unsurprisingly, but it wasn’t a Lasker-Pelikan, since I was white and played a passive variation of the Ruy Lopez that I didn’t understand :-)).

Of course today the Lasker-Pelikan is not considered to be inferior at all – it’s called the Sveshnikov variation (strictly speaking only after Sveshnikov’s ...b5 plan) and is one of the main stays of many strong players up to super GM level.

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Tue Jan 22, 2008 9:33 am
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Post Re: BKildahl - Why I Play What I Play [10:35]
Congrats, this video was selected for ChessVideos.TV classics #2.

http://www.chessvideos.tv/news-ChessVid ... -2-239.php

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Sun Jul 18, 2010 4:16 pm
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Post Re: BKildahl - Why I Play What I Play [10:35]
You don't think you are missing out on the many different positions and structures you could get to play if you did play something more mainline like 1.e4?

While it is true you are going to win more games by playing a system opening, don't you think you are somewhat hampering your chess development by only playing 1 type of position from both sides of the board?


Mon Jul 19, 2010 9:18 am
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Post Re: BKildahl - Why I Play What I Play [10:35]
I made a reply video to this one, but for some reason it hasn't posted. I'll try again and hopefully it'll work.

Anyway, I talk about the process through which I've learned mainlines and the time it took.


Mon Jul 19, 2010 11:49 am
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Post Re: BKildahl - Why I Play What I Play [10:35]
augelmo's video is now posted:

viewtopic.php?t=7238

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Mon Jul 19, 2010 12:32 pm
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Post Re: BKildahl - Why I Play What I Play [10:35]
interesting video, but I have to say I simply hate the kings indian for black. The unfortunate problem is that in addition to black often being cramped, white has so many ways of handling it. White can settle for a slightly better endgame with d4 Nf6 c4 g6 Nc3 Bg7 e4 0-0 Be2 e5 dxe5, or he can play the very agressive four pawns attack to blow black off the board, or the samich variation to get a kingside attack. I even like the main line position for white, where white is probably strategically won but black can create counterplay with a kingside attack. Of course this "strategically won" position is very difficult to flawlessly win and destroy black completely, and only a great player like Kramnik does that. Still, 2200 and 2300 positional monsters usually squash me like a bug in the main line of the kings indian :P Of course, I'd still be willing to play the kings indian against anyone below 2000 :)


Mon Jul 19, 2010 12:38 pm
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Post Re: BKildahl - Why I Play What I Play [10:35]
There is nothing wrong with playing system opening but reply to f5 with d3 makes me cringe. You better off following basic opening principles instead of always relinquishing your first move advantage. Not to be recommended to beginners as a way to improve their game. This approach to chess is way to lazy. It is fine to play hedgehog structure with Black no matter what white plays but in the long run you need to learn some mainstream openings to be familiar with different middle game structures.


Wed Jul 21, 2010 4:37 pm
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